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Scott Shafiroff Racing Engines 427CI Small-Block Crate Engine - Stacked And Packed

SSRE adds a set of stacks to a proven 427ci small-block crate engine

By Michael Galimi, Photography by The Author

Unique and easy are two words that are rarely combined in this great hobby we call hot rodding. This month, however, is one of those situations where they come together and co-exist. This cohesion happened with a 427ci small-block package from Scott Shafiroff Racing Engines (SSRE) and the latest EZ-EFI induction from Inglese. The small-block comes from the popular Real Street line-up, while the fuel injection is truly an easy bolt-on thanks to the FAST EZ-EFI system that’s included in the package. It’s a self-learning fuel injection system that doesn’t require tuning experience or a laptop. And the Inglese intake manifold features a set of eight stacks to mimic the old school Weber carburetor setup.

The SSRE Real Street lineup was designed to provide reliable power, but come in at a reasonable price tag. The base Real Street 427/525 hp goes for just $8,795 and adding the HHR (Hot Hydraulic Roller) package bumps the price tag up by $995. That includes a larger hydraulic roller camshaft (SSRE specs), upgraded valvetrain, and CNC-ported AFR 210cc cylinder heads to bring power up to 565 hp. Adding the uniqueness of the Inglese EFI system will then add another $5,200, bringing the total cost to $14,990. That includes an MSD EFI compatible ignition and a full day’s worth of shop labor installing, adjusting, and final tuning on the dyno. Unique and easy do come at a price, but that’s a cheaper than what EFI used to cost just a few years ago.

Inside the Real Street 427 is a parts list that starts with a Dart SHP block for a foundation. Said block is designed to keep costs in check, but still offer a solid starting point. It’s reassuring to know that you start with a brand new iron block instead of a used one you found in a junkyard. SSRE then fills it with an Eagle 4340 forged crankshaft, Eagle 4340 forged connecting rods, Mahle pistons (SSRE design), AFR heads (CNC-ported, 210cc intake ports), and a SSRE hydraulic roller camshaft. The engine is designed to run on 91-octane fuel and that’s what they use to dial-in the engine on the dyno--making the power results applicable in all 50 states. Higher octane will allow for more timing and higher power results.

The EFI system was engineered for easy installation and the self-tuning option of the FAST electronic fuel injection makes it the perfect solution for those who are not comfortable with computers. The SSRE staff ship the engines fully tuned and calibrated on the dyno and ready to bolt in your muscle car. The stacks are unique and don’t degrade the easiness of this package--it’s truly a drop-in-and-go combination.

Inglese partnered with its sister company, FAST, to incorporate its EZ-EFI system with the popular stack induction. The name says it all; it’s designed to be easy, and with the Shafiroff expertise it helps to make the conversion to modern EFI as effortless as possible. Those with computerphobia should have no fear because this system is targeted at you.

FAST introduced EZ-EFI in 2009, and it has been a popular upgrade since then. The hand-held programmer requires a few basic questions to be answered about the engine and once you fire it up, the ECU learns on its own. No tuning experience is required or necessary to get the EZ-EFI up and running. That’s what made it so attractive to Shafiroff.

After talking with the FAST guys for a little bit, I knew this was a system we could offer at SSRE and be reliable and easy for our customers, he says. If the Inglese stacks aren’t for you, SSRE also offers the system with a single throttle body on top of a carb-style intake and with the same EZ-EFI system.

The Inglese induction system offers some great features other than the looks. The stacks measure 50mm IDA each for unrestricted flow and the company reports its good until 1,000 hp. One look at the intake and you’d think it might hinder torque production down low. That wasn’t the case at all and the power curve was consistent and healthy as evident by the 588 lb-ft result.

By Michael Galimi
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