Super Chevy
Click here to find out more!

Aluminum Driveshaft Production - Getting The Shaft

Upgrading To An Aluminum Driveshaft.

By Dan Sanchez, Photography by Dan Sanchez

If you know the difference between rear wheel horsepower and flywheel horsepower, then you also know that the drivetrain is what makes the difference. It takes lots of power to spin your car's drivetrain components, so lightening it up by reducing any reciprocating weight can yield some extra power at the rear wheels. Depending on the application, switching to an aluminum driveshaft is probably one of the best ways to achieve this.

Most driveshaft shops, such as Inland Empire Driveline Service, need the length of your factory shaft that's measured from center to center, from the front and rear U-joints. Because the diameter and tubing thickness is important to your aluminum upgrade, we asked Inland Empire Driveline Service to show us how one is made for a typical muscle car application.

In this instance an aluminum driveshaft for a Chevelle was being built using 3-inch diameter aluminum tubing and heavy-duty Spicer components. The build process involves assembly, measuring, checking the driveshaft runout and balancing. In the end, IEDS created a direct replacement shaft that's more than 20 pounds lighter than the factory steel unit, improving the vehicle's acceleration and allowing more power to get to the rear wheels.

SOURCES
Inland Empire Driveline
4035 East Guasti Rd
Suite 301
Ontario
CA  91761
800-800-0109
www.iedls.com
By Dan Sanchez
Enjoyed this Post? Subscribe to our RSS Feed, or use your favorite social media to recommend us to friends and colleagues!
Super Chevy