Storing 1990 Chevrolet Corvettes - Tech Corner

James Berry Nov 1, 2009 0 Comment(s)

3. Drive the vehicle until it reaches normal operating temperature.

4. Park the vehicle over clean cardboard. The fluid spots on the cardboard will help you pinpoint where the leak is coming from.

5. If you still have a problem pinpointing the leak, you can use a specially formulated dye and a black light. Follow the dye manufacturer's instructions to determine the amount of dye to use.

6. Once you've located the leak with the black light, make the necessary repair.

Question:I just read an article about remote keyless-entry kits for '92 and earlier Corvettes. Unfortunately, I can't find any of these kits. Are they still available?
Dave
Via the Internet

Answer:One of the best kits for the Corvette was the GM-VKE, which was simple to install, required very few modifications, and could be purchased from your local GM dealer. While this kit is no longer available, there are many companies that still offer remote keyless-entry systems for the Vette.

We spoke to Greg Goeders at Spal USA. Spal offers the AS-80 (PN 345000093) Universal Keyless Entry, which fits virtually any vehicle. It comes with two waterproof remote transmitters that operate from up to 100 feet away. The AS-80 also offers blinker identification, universal power-lock control, dome-light control, and a valet function. You'll also need to order Spal's 2-Door Lock Kit (PN 37000015), which has two actuators, a wiring harness, and all necessary hardware. Professional installation is recommended. For more information, visit wwwspalusa.com or call (800) 345-0327.

According to Goeders, some cutting of the factory wiring harness is required. I'll be obtaining one of these systems from Spal soon and will let you know how the installation goes.

Question:Since we ran our Q&A on ethanol, we've received several questions on the benefits and drawbacks to ethanol and E85. The most common queries include: Why does E85 burn richer than gasoline? and, Will I need to replace any components in my older Corvette, since E85 has a different stoichiometric mixture than gas? We spoke with Fritz Kayl, president of Katech Performance, and this is what he had to say:

Vemp_0911_05_z Storing_1990_chevrolet_corvettes Ethanol_pump 1/5

Answer (E85):There are still a lot of misconceptions about E85 among consumers. First, E85 runs at a richer air/fuel ratio (9.8:1) than gasoline (14.7:1), not leaner. This is the reason you get poorer fuel economy on E85 [and explains] why flex-fuel cars have not had a major impact on gasoline sales. Most people still go to the gasoline pump instead of the E85 pump for their fill-ups. Although many people claim they want to be green, most still drive by their wallets.

Next, vehicles need to be produced at the factory to run on E85. Not much changes in the actual architecture of the engine, but the seals, fuel lines, gas tanks, fuel pumps, and more all have to be compatible with the high alcohol content. Today's vehicles (excluding flex-fuel models) can only withstand approximately 13 percent alcohol. This explains why converting older vehicles to run on E85 has not caught on-there are just too many parts that need replacement.

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