Greenwood C4 Hoodscoop Install

Our project C4 begins to take shape--thanks to the help of a Corvette-customizing legend

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For those familiar with the non-stock aspects of '70s Stingrays, thename John Greenwood will be unquestionably familiar. Race-proven resultsare one metric by which to gauge John's immeasurable achievements forthe Corvette. Other descriptive words were usually uttered bycompetitors who lost to John and his uniquely rebranded Corvettes--wordswe're pretty sure we can't print. Like him or lost to him, no one candeny the Greenwood name is as synonymous with Corvette racing ofyesteryear as the C6.R moniker is with today's on-track efforts.

But the story doesn't stop there. Greenwood Corvettes, now a familyowned-and-operated business (John has since retired), is still at it.With kits available for the C4, C5, and C6, Greenwood has continued itsdedication to the hobby by bringing its products from the past into thepresent.

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This should be a familiar piece. If not, please step away from yourCorvette--we'll be by shortly to pick it up. With the hood disconnectedfrom our subject '87, we could begin our dissection.

After the C3 era, Greenwood seamlessly made the switch to building C4pieces, culminating into the often-imitated-but-never-equaled Greenwoodstyling kit seen throughout the '80s and '90s. The development of thiskit has never ceased, and the results of this continued refinement canbe seen on the company's Web site, www.greenwoodcorvettes.com. It wasthe C4 kit that caught Team VETTE's eye on a recent hunt for a uniquelook for our project car, "Son of Zombie." Why Greenwood? Given thechoice between proven pieces and cheap knock-offs, there isn't really achoice at all.

Not quite ready to run the full gamut, we chose some of the simplermodifications that would yield the real-world results we were lookingfor with a minimal investment. After a quick discussion with MikeGuyette, Greenwood Corvettes' director of sales and marketing, wedecided to go with the company's high-rise hood and hood louvers. For anextra advantage, we also chose a windshield fairing, which we'll coverin an upcoming article.

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Tim Gutierrez of Strictly Vettes begins the process by layingGreenwood's high-rise hood in place. Using a Sharpie and a ruler, Timfinds and marks the correct position for the part.

The reasoning? Not long from now our C4's engine bay will be upgradedwith the help of a ZZ4 crate engine, an ACCEL Super Ram intake, as wellas numerous other high-performance bits. While not required, theGreenwood pieces will complement these mods in several areas. Thehigh-rise hood will deliver additional air where it's needed most, whilea set of baffle-equipped hood louvers will help dissipate heat anddirect any wayward water out of the bay. The windshield fairing? Bysmoothing out an aerodynamically "sticky" point on the front of our C4,turbulence and wind noise will be reduced. In addition, side driprailsare included and will catch any rain that falls into our lap as we exit.

With the "whats" and "whys" out of the way, we concentrated on the"hows." For our installation, which isn't for the faint of heart,Strictly Vettes of Denver was chosen. When it came time to start, TimGutierrez expertly blended the pieces into the hood. Thanks to thecraftsmanship and descriptive instructions included in the kit, theGreenwood Corvette pieces went on in no time. How did it look in theend? Well, if you were at Mid America's Funfest, chances are you saw usnext to the Primedia subscription booth. If not, look no further thanthe accompanying photos to see how you, too, can achieve this unique andfunctional look.

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