Small Block Chevy Test Engine Results - Danger Mouse Recap, History, and Summary

Learning How To Make Tons Of Extra Power

Mike Petralia Dec 1, 2003 0 Comment(s)

CLICK BELOW TO SEE ALL OF THE STORIES COVERING THE BUILD OF PROJECT DANGER MOUSE

DANGER MOUSE PART 1

DANGER MOUSE PART 3

DANGER MOUSE PART 4

DANGER MOUSE PART 5

DANGER MOUSE PART 7

DANGER MOUSE PART 8

DANGER MOUSE PART 9

DANGER MOUSE PART 10

DANGER MOUSE PART 13

DANGER MOUSE PART 14

DANGER MOUSE PART 15

DANGER MOUSE PART 18

DANGER MOUSE PART 20

DANGER MOUSE PART 22

DANGER MOUSE PART 23

DANGER MOUSE PART 24

DANGER MOUSE PART 25

Sucp_0312_02_z Danger_mouse 355_cid 1/11

When we built Danger Mouse (DM) more than a year ago, the plan was simple. We wanted to have an engine in our stable that we could use to test and re-test every possible power combination we could think of. Our plan also included testing any of the smart combinations you guys could come up with as well, and the letters started pouring in. DM was the going to be the first magazine engine built specifically to test readers' ideas. Well, after more than 1,000 dyno pulls, (not all of which were recorded), with both high and low results, we've tried so many powerful combinations that we think we've found a few new recipes for perfection. If you'd like to make 480-plus hp with your stock 355-cid short-block, we've got that covered. Or how about making over 600 hp on pump gas from the same 355-cid and not sacrificing next year's vacation to do it? Danger Mouse can show you how. We've even covered the newest EFI technology too. And best of all. it's right in here.

Sucp_0312_04_z Danger_mouse Intake_port 2/11


The Beginning
For a quick recap since DM's inception, here's the low-down. We built DM with the intention of running it ragged on the dyno trying to make every combination work the best way possible. So, to reach that goal, DM had to be tough to take the abuse we planned to dish out. Starting with a World Products four-bolt Motown block, we bored it .030-over and dropped in a complete Lunati rotating assembly making it displace 355 cid. We even left the flat-top Lunati pistons 0.040-inch down the bore (as opposed to a true "zero-deck") to more closely approximate what you might have under your hood. Then we bolted some rather boring stock GM iron components to the top of it and slapped it on the dyno for its first run. After that day was finished, we were happy to report that with just a few tuning tweaks to dial it in, DM made an outstanding 308 hp and 395 ft-lb of torque in totally stock trim (see Test 1). Then we spent the rest of the year testing different top end combinations, while we left the bottom end completely untouched, to see how much power we could make and what helped us get there the easiest. This month's story is a recap of the best tests from the latter-half of 2003, (we've already recapped the first half in the May 2003 issue) plus what we think is the best overall combination we came up for your money.


The Best Build
Through all this we've learned that there are certain ways to build an engine to give you the best power-per-dollar. And the best thing is that all the combinations we've tried so far would be easy for you to duplicate yourself. Perhaps the best combination for the money we've tested has to be the Vortec iron heads and COMP Cams XE262 camshaft with an Edelbrock Performer RPM Air Gap intake we ran in DM Part 6 (February 2003). This engine made tons of low-end torque and still managed over 415 hp-and all from a very affordable and streetable package that even makes enough vacuum for power brakes.

T15-DM Part 6: GM Vortec iron heads SDPC PN SD8060A (64cc chambers, 170cc intake runner volume, 1.94/1.50 valves) with Comp Cams 1.6:1 Magnum roller tip rockers PN 1418-16, Edelbrock Performer RPM Air Gap Vortec intake manifold PN 7516 COMP Cams XE262H cam (262/270 advance duration, 218/224 duration at .050, .462/.469 valve lift, 110 lobe separation) straight up.

MORE PHOTOS

VIEW FULL GALLERY

COMMENTS

TO TOP