1956 Chevy 210 Sedan - Resto Tech

Ronney Kissinger Nov 1, 2003 0 Comment(s)

The second most common mistake is installing the rear trans mounts on either side of the trans before the engine goes in. Don't do it! The mounts bolt to the rear of the frame extensions and with the car on the ground, there simply is not enough room to slide the trans with mounts under the frame and then back up to bolt in the mounts. I suppose you could dig a hole in your driveway allowing the trans to dip under and up, but I would suggest putting on the rear mounts after the engine is in position and sitting firmly on the front mounts. You can and should have already installed the front mounts before you lift in the motor and trans. Supporting the engine and trans with the lift, you can now crawl under and install the transmission mounts. The driver's side is a little tricky, but not all that bad. Simple, huh? Well, not exactly, but if you follow these few tips it should make the job just a little easier. The engine mount kits you are looking for can be found at fine stores like Classic Chevy International at (800)456-1957 or Danchuck at (800)648-9554.

That's about it. I'm sure with a little patience, that old reliable 283 and powerglide will find its home once again.


Disco Tech
I'm looking for a little help with the brakes on my '62 Corvette. The old drum units just don't get it anymore and I am a little tired of replacing wheel cylinders. I am the original owner and always wanted to keep it stock but these days safety is my main concern so I am willing to upgrade the front brakes to disc. Could you please point me in the right direction as far as a kit or parts? Great magazine. It is the first I pick up every month at my local supermarket.Ward BurlowPortland, OR

Boy, Ward, you have to pay more attention to our full-page ads, especially the brake ads. After all, they pay most of the bills around here, which in turn keeps the info flowing to you, our loyal readers.

Master Power Brakes is the place to pick up a complete bolt on kit for your Vette. The kit includes everything you need including a dual master cylinder, calipers, hoses, and brackets to make it truly a bolt-on project. Just give Master Power Brakes a call at (888)251-2353 or on the web at www.mpbrakes.com. They also carry kits and parts for most popular Bow-Ties and a slew of neat accessories, exactly as they advertise.


Triple Threat
I'm looking for a set of carbs for a '69 Corvette 427 with the L-89 engine. We have a local swap meet about every 6 weeks in our area with a guy that specializes in Holley used carbs but he doesn't know the three part numbers I need for the three two-barrel carbs. He tells me the middle carb is different from the front and rear. Any help on how to identify the carbs would help. I already have the manifold with a casting number of 3937795. Hopefully, the intake is correct.Todd BenekeLong Beach, CA

Looks like the intake manifold will work, Todd. It's a 3 x 2 Holley for a '69 Corvette with the 435 horse 427. The carbs, on the other hand, are getting harder to find than a Ford at a Super Chevy Show! As you undoubtedly know, the number stamped on the air horn of the carb, commonly known as the list number, is the main identifier. The Holley guy at the swap meet is correct about the center carb being different. It carries a list number of 4056-1. The front and rear units carry the list number 3659. Also, below the list number should be a date code. If you can read it, it should be something like 9-6-1. The nine indicates 1969, the 6 equals June and the 1 is the week of the month. That's only an example but gives you an idea of the year the carbs were built and if you're lucky, the date codes will match your '69 Corvette. I'm sure with enough time and patience, you will find just the set you're looking for. By the way, the demand for the Holley 3 x 2 set up has been in such demand we understand that Holley has re-released some 3 x 2 carbs just for the restoration industry. It might be worth a call to Holley at (800)HOLLEY-1 or on the web at www.holley.com. Check it out!

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