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Here’s One Way to Mount Remote Shock Reservoirs on a Pro Touring Second-Gen Camaro

Tips to Mounting Your Remote Shock Reservoirs: Easy as 1-2-3

Chuck Vranas May 7, 2015
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With Project Orange Krate, our 1971 Camaro, almost ready to tear up the streets, there was one more bit of performance to add to the mix. Knowing that the car will see plenty of action on the dragstrip, road course, and autocross, a decision was made to add a set of the slickest shocks available to enhance Orange Krate’s handling during all driving conditions. JRi has taken their race-proven shocks and adapted them to the street performance market to give car owners an edge when they’re competing at the track. We selected their double-adjustable, monotube, custom-built and dyno-tested Pro Touring shocks, which come complete with remote reservoir canisters. The units are nitrogen-filled and incorporate a gas-charged bladder to provide high frequency and low-speed damping control. Matched with coil springs from Detroit Speed Inc., it was easy to see this would be a winning combination.

Working with Orange Krate builder, Peter Newell of Competition Specialties in Walpole, Massachusetts, on where and how to mount the remote reservoirs to an already complete, highly detailed car was a bit of a challenge. Luckily for us, Aeromotive just so happens to offer trick 2-inch billet mounting brackets, which fit the bill perfectly for what we had planned.

Once Newell assessed the situation, he got busy starting at the rear of the car, installing the remote canisters above the rearend to the floor area, allowing service access. When it came time to settle the front units in place, the Aeromotive mounts were secured to a very slick place on the rear steel support brackets for the inner carbon-fiber wheeltubs, giving the engine bay another race-inspired facet with easy service accessibility.

Stay tuned as Orange Krate will be taking both national and local tracks by storm in the coming months.

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1. For the ultimate in handling, we chose a set of JRi Pro Touring double-adjustable coilover shocks (PN 100-110) for our second-gen Camaro project.

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2. Peter Newell of Competition Specialties in Walpole, Massachusetts, showed us how easy it was to prepare the shocks for installation and started by adding a Detroit Speed Inc. coil spring to the combination.

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3. The JRi coil spring top retainer is then set in place followed by snapping the spring retainer clip into place at the top of the shock.

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4. With the shock and coil spring now a completed unit, Newell illustrates how the adjustments can be made depending on the car’s individual performance demands.

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5. Here you can see the complete assembly as it waits to go into project Orange Krate, with the nitrogen-filled adjustable remote reservoir seen on the left side of the unit.

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6. For killer looks and secure mounting, we used these 2-inch billet brackets from Aeromotive (PN 12305). They’ll add plenty of coolness and a ton of race inspiration to our project.

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7. The 2-inch Aeromotive billet clamp was slipped onto the canister and lightly tightened into place, preparing it for installation to the rear of the car.

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8. With the shocks mounted in place, Newell found the perfect place to mount both the left and right reservoirs above the rearend near the trunk floor.

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9. Once the front shocks were assembled, it was time to install them into place.

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10. Here you can see a front JRi shock mounted in place within the Detroit Speed Inc. hydroformed subframe, with the reservoir line set in place above the framerail.

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11. The Aeromotive 2-inch billet mounting clamp was secured in place on the canister body and prepared for final mounting in the engine bay.

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12. Although the canister appears to be floating above the custom carbon-fiber inner wheeltub, it’s actually secured to a factory steel support brace, making it one of the slickest installations we’ve seen.

Sources

Competition Specialties
508-510-7043
www.competition-specialties.com
Aeromotive
Lenexa, KS 66214
913-647-7300
http://www.aeromotiveinc.com
Detroit Speed
Mooresville, NC 28115
704-662-3272
www.detroitspeed.com
JRI Shocks
704-660-8346
www.jrishocks.com

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