1970 Chevy Nova Bodywork - Sheet (Metal) Happens!

CARS Inc. Makes Sheetmetal Happen For Our Nova

Mike Harrington Mar 29, 2007 0 Comment(s)
Sucs_0700_17_z 1970_chevy_nova New_quarter_panel 1/29

In the rear, it goes over the fender's lip and right under the decklid where the weatherstripping is located. That's not a bad piece of metal.

Sucs_0700_18_z 1970_chevy_nova New_quarter_panel 2/29

We don't plan to use every square inch of it, so some trimming down to size will be required. Still, it's nice to have a full-sized piece.

Sucs_0700_19_z 1970_chevy_nova Panel_trimming 3/29

Albert Venegas (the shop foreman at Harrison's Restorations) took the lead role in getting the panel trimmed and fit to size. I decided my skills could still use some more improvement in this department, so Albert demonstrated his skills. In this photo, he's scoring the metal or tracing where we need to make our preliminary cuts.

Sucs_0700_20_z 1970_chevy_nova Panel_grinding 4/29

We decided we didn't need to replace the door jamb, since the jamb on the Nova was in excellent shape. We simply trimmed the panel to fit.

Sucs_0700_21_z 1970_chevy_nova Panel_welding 5/29

After the panel is clamped into place, further trimming is required to create a perfect butt joint for the welds. You might have to take the panel off and on several times, trimming a little off with every fitting. It's kind of like getting a tailor-made suit: there's lots of measuring and test-fitting.

Sucs_0700_22_z 1970_chevy_nova Panel_welding 6/29

A couple of hours later, the panel is perfectly fit, and Albert starts tack-welding it into place. Like we said earlier, we plan on removing the panel again on account of the rusted inner panel. Our plans for this Nova are to take it to a media blaster and have it blasted down to the bare metal. Before we do that, we want to get all the sheetmetal trimmed and fit. That way, when it comes back from the blaster, we can jump right into it.

COMMENTS

TO TOP