Camaro Z28 Stripes - Getting Striped

Putting Stripes On Your Camaro The Easy Way

PJ Rentie Oct 1, 2000 0 Comment(s)
Sucp_0010_01_z Camaro_z28_stripes Z28_camaro 1/15

One of the features that separates mediocre cars from the really cool ones is their paint schemes. We're not talking about color choices; we're talking about graphics-like flames, scallops, and those classic musclecar stripes. The thing about really cool, timeless graphics is that the car will look just as good in 20 years as it does today. That's just part of the appeal of '60s and '70s musclecars and the graphics that adorned them. They're not overstated, but they do just enough to enhance the car's attitude.

Take second-generation Z/28s, for example. To the untrained eye, it's just a Camaro with stripes, but to those of us who know, two simple stripes can give an otherwise docile-looking Camaro tons of visual muscle. However, there is one important factor-the stripes have got to be done right. Remember that these aren't just stripes, they're stripes outlined with additional smaller stripes. Painting these stripes incorrectly can mean the difference between a cool car and a geek wagon. That's where Park Ridge, Illinois-based Stencils & Stripes comes in. Stencils & Stripes supplies stencil kits for many popular cars that will help even the novice painter get just the right stripe design-complete with all the proper gaps.

Sucp_0010_03_z Camaro_z28_stripes Coverage 2/15

When applying a coat of paint, overspray can end up in places you don't want it to go. So before you begin, make sure that the areas on the car that aren't getting painted are completely covered and masked off.

While Sal Perez of American Muscle Cars isn't exactly what you would call a novice when it comes to musclecars, he wanted to make sure that the stripes on this Camaro were right. If you can find the exact center of the hood, you're on your way to a set of perfect stripes. The tips of the stripes are the difficult areas, so Stencil & Stripes' kit consists of exactly that-the ends. You mark the hood and trunk where the instructions tell you to, lay out the stencils (which are the stripe ends), and use tape to complete the stripe centers.

The real cool part about the stencils is that they're basically stickers, which makes them a piece of cake to apply. As you can see, the end result is a set of perfectly lined-up stripes that look just as good as a big-buck job, and give your car that classic musclecar look.

MORE PHOTOS

VIEW FULL GALLERY

COMMENTS

subscribe to the magazine

get digital get print
TO TOP