Jet Hot Coatings - Trickle-Down Theory

Jet-Hot Coatings Bring Space-Age Technology To The Racetrack And The Street

John Nelson Jul 1, 2000 0 Comment(s)
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It's human nature to build things, whether it be a great monument that millions look up to, or a personal project that only holds meaning for the person who built it. Nature, on the other hand, does her best to tear these works down. The great pyramids of Egypt are still standing, but they certainly show the effects of thousands of years of exposure to the elements. They may be on a smaller scale, but our Bow-Ties are monuments to American engineering prowess, our enthusiast heritage, even individual car-building ability. But despite thousands of years of scientific progress, damage from the elements is still a problem when it comes to making our "monuments" stand the test of time. Many racers, and more than a few enthusiasts, are already familiar with Jet-Hot and its metallic-ceramic coatings. This trickle-down technology is invaluable when it comes to standing up to the elements and hard usage.

Like many other technologies that we now accept as commonplace, metallic-ceramic coatings were first used in the military. Extreme heat and severe weather conditions are obvious concerns in applications such as jet planes and submarines. Enter Metallic Ceramic Coating, Inc., President Mike Novakovic. During his tour of duty as a Navy fighter pilot, Novakovic gained firsthand knowledge of (and experience with) the coatings used on the jets he flew. After his discharge, he went to work for the company that owned the patent for the metallic-ceramic coating process. When the patent expired, Novakovic redeveloped the coating material, which was then approved for use by the Navy. Jet-Hot was formed to bring this technology to auto and marine enthusiasts and racers. According to MCCI, the third-generation Jet-Hot coatings excel in three ways: by providing "unmatched beauty, space-age strength, and unparalleled corrosion resistance."

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The Jet-Hot lineup currently consists of several types of coatings, covering several types of applications. Perhaps the best known is the Sterling Silver coating, which looks great while providing the aforementioned protective qualities. The Thermal Dissipation (which speeds the removal of heat) and Thermal Barrier (which helps retain heat) coatings are typically used on oil pans. There's a "gold" coating to meet the needs of the marine industry, and then there's Jet-Hot's latest, Jet-Hot 2000. This new coating was developed for race (i.e., NASCAR) and other extreme-heat applications, such as rotary and turbo cars, and can handle temperatures over 2000 degrees Fahrenheit. On top of all this, Jet-Hot is currently working with the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation on a coating for use on the state's road-salting trucks. Hopefully this technology will trickle down to the many East Coast and Midwest enthusiasts who are used to parking their rides for the winter!

Needless to say, the type of high-tech protection that Jet-Hot coatings provide is invaluable to enthusiasts who want performance and looks. And while we could go on and on about the many applications for Jet-Hot, a picture's worth a thousand words, right? Let's take a behind-the-scenes look at the process.

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Cutting-Edge, And Cheap, Too?
One of the services offered by Jet-Hot is "Jet-Hot Direct." A call to the company's Express Order Line allows you to order the new headers of your choice. Your new parts are then treated to a detailing process before being covered with one of Jet-Hot's coatings. The payoff is that the headers are discounted to manufacturer's prices-saving you 40 to 60 percent. In addition to the protective qualities, Jet-Hot claims that its coatings reduce under-hood temperatures, improve exhaust flow, and increase header life. It all adds up to increased performance for less money. What more can you ask for?

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