383 Stroker Top End Build - Mighty Mouse

Finishing The Top End Of Our 383 Stroker

Sean Haggai Nov 19, 2010 0 Comment(s)
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Need more power from your mill?
That's easy enough; just open up the bores and increase its reach. Or, just add more air and fuel-voilà! Building a potent powerplant is nothing more than adding some ingredients and stirring the pot. It isn't rocket science!

1101chp_01_o 383_stroker_top_end_build 383_engine 2/14

When we decided to piece together a real-world stroker mill, we chose the 383 foundation because of its simplicity, proven potential on the dyno, and overall affordability. The brunt of our labor so far has involved the machine work for our Engine Quest small-block core. The rest of our time was spent putting it all together.

Last time, we finished putting together the short-block ("Setting the Groundwork," Nov. '10). Fortifying the bottom-end is an Eagle ESP Armored forged rotating assembly that included the crankshaft, rods and pistons, along with the rings and bearings.

This month, we are finishing up the build by completing the top-end assembly. This build is far from a high-end race motor. Instead, we plan to put this gem on the street. That said, driveability needed to be key with this particular combination. To achieve this, we finished our build with a set of heavy-breathing Edelbrock E-210 aluminum cylinder heads. Our set was equipped for a hydraulic roller camshaft and came complete with oversized valves (2.08-/1.60-inch intake/exhaust). We then matched it with an RPM Air-Gap manifold to maximize low- and mid-range torque. Of course, The Air-Gap has also proven itself to carry the horsepower through the upper powerband, making it ideal for our needs.

To see how we did, we headed over to Westech Performance Center and hooked up our mill to their Superflow 902 engine dyno. We knew it wasn't going to be record breaker, but we were still impressed by the final numbers. You'll have to read on to get the complete breakdown of what it made and how we built it.

Quick Notes

What We Did
Installed a fresh set of 23-degree Edelbrock E-210 cylinder heads, RPM Air-Gap manifold, and a complete Moroso oiling system

Bottom Line
A Sherman tank for the streets

Cost (Approx)
$7,200

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