New Tech Traction Devices - What A Drag, Part 7

We add some new tech traction devices to our Nova SS509 project

Dan Foley Aug 31, 2012 0 Comment(s)
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While strip testing our SS509 Nova project car for our last installment (July 2012), we couldn't depress the go-pedal too quickly off the line or the Nitto NT555R Drag Radials (325/50R15) would spin. The rear of the body was lifting instead of squatting during launch and the front end wasn't rising to shift the weight to plant the rear tires.

We wanted the Total Cost Involved front clip, which is designed for superior road holding, autocross or road course action, to also work on our Nova SS509 street/strip car, but we had a problem. Or two. The old school traction bars (aka slapper bars) usually work well with a stock-type front suspension that has a few more inches of suspension travel. The slapper bars were not working with our reduced front suspension travel. Also, the rear shocks that were in the car when we bought it probably expired sometime during Ronald Reagan's first term in office. To put it mildly, they were purely decorative at this point.

Technology advancements in the suspension and tire department have come a long way in recent years and we needed to take advantage of that and put it to use on our Nova. After looking at the options for our leaf-spring suspended X-body, we felt Competition Engineering's Slide-A-Links would be a step in the right direction. At the same time, we ponied up for a set of Competition Engineering's adjustable rear shocks. And are we glad we did. We swapped-out those old slapper bars and shocks and everything got better. The Nova's ride, handling and hook improved enough to make us feel like entering an autocross or road course competition for some additional fun. Our 60-foot times improved at the strip, despite our being handicapped with lots of summer heat and humidity. Read along and see the easy installation and how we made out strip testing with the Slide-A-Links and Comp Engineering adjustable rear shocks.

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16 We used the Density Altitude Calculator from the www.dragtimes.com website to discover our 10.76 at 125.03 was corrected to 10.55 at 127.50 using our previous test's weather data. Just enter the date, time, e.t. and mph from your time-slip and the DA Calculator estimates your corrected e.t. for the weather conditions of the track you're running on that day and hour.

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