Edelbrock Performance Parts: Suspension - A New, Old Ride

Waking Up An Old Cruiser With The New Edelbrock Suspension Package

Seth Millhollin Feb 1, 2002 0 Comment(s)
Sucp_0202_01_z Edelbrock_performance_parts_suspension Suspension_kit 1/20

Here's the complete Edelbrock Suspension Package. It includes lowering coil springs, IAS shock absorbers, upper and lower trailing arms, braces, and all required hardware. We also used steel-braided brake lines and speed bleeders from Russell Performance Products, a new member of the Edelbrock Company.

For as long as there have been hot rods, Edelbrock has supplied performance products for those who drive them. From flathead-powered cars to high-tech, fuel-injected vehicles, Edelbrock has produced parts to enhance their performance. In today's world, where performance is judged on a more variable playing field that includes more than just straight-line racing and mega-horsepower, things such as cornering, handling, body roll, and braking become infinitely more important.

For some time, Edelbrock has had an on-going development of the goal to offer a complete suspension package for today's more well-rounded enthusiasts, supplying them with everything needed to get their project on the right track in one kit.

The new suspension package from Edelbrock consists of common items, with an improved design, that are easy to install. As with most of the company's product line, the suspension package components are direct-bolt-on items. The "package" consists of IAS (Inertia Active System) shock absorbers, Eibach coil springs, upper and lower trailing arms, and braces. Together, this system of integrated parts will direct your musclecar to a different level of handling.

There's little doubt that the key ingredient of this package is performance. And with it, the quality of construction is paramount. Each trailing arm is of a boxed-style design and incorporates greasable polyurethane bushings at each end. Both upper and lower arms are cold rolled, .120-inch wall steel for strength and durability. Frankly, what these parts are designed to do is take the flex out and keep the rear axle properly located. Keeping the rear axle centered is a primary factor in attaining the proper handling characteristics for today's canyon carvers and boulevard bruisers. It's for this reason, as well, that trailing arm braces are used.

Sucp_0202_04_z Edelbrock_performance_parts_suspension Trailing_arm_comparison 2/20

Here's the Edelbrock trailing arm compared to the stock ones that were removed. Even next to the factory boxed arm, the Edelbrock arms are much stronger and use greaseable polyurethane bushings. Note that the lower arms have welded bosses to accept factory-style rear sway bars.

Trailing arm braces were actually offered by GM and were, in most cases, installed on big-block and four-speed cars. Though the idea is the same, the design of Edelbrock's brace is different. The design triangulates the framerails and crossmember using the trailing arm bolt location. In simple terms, these braces control frame and crossmember flex generated by the increased loads of the stronger trailing arms. If you keep the frame from flexing, you can improve the axle location in relation to the center of the frame.

The test vehicle that we chose to install this suspension package on is a '69 El Camino that has been "mothballed" for the better part of a decade. The Bow-Tie hauler features both a Rat motor and a four-speed manual transmission, making it a perfect guinea pig to test this mix of components. Before the car's early retirement, it was driven up and down the West Coast winning more than its share of the gold at various Super Chevy Shows. The car was built as a very clean restoration and has retained much of that condition over the years. Thanks to the owner's properly storing it, it looks just as good now as it did then.

Since the Elky has been brought back to life, it has again made its way to local cruises and has been driven for any other excuse that could be thought of. After a few cruises and trips around town, the owner decided that the car needed a little more than what the stock suspension was capable of. It needed to handle just a little bit better. With the Eibach coil springs designed as a lowering spring, the suspension change provided just enough of a face-lift to make the car look even cooler. Knowing about these products, we were anxious to complete the installation.

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