2010 Chevrolet Camaro SS Clutch & Ring-And-Pinion Install - Gearing Up - Tech

We Put The Freeze On A Set Of Richmond Gears And Step Up The Clutch In Our 2010 Camaro SS Test Car

Justin Cesler Oct 28, 2010 0 Comment(s)
View Full Gallery

If you have been following along with our 2010 Camaro SS buildup, you may recall our last track outing ("Breathin' Easy," September '10) ended prematurely thanks to both a sticky clutch pedal and a completely destroyed stock posi unit. While we did manage to run a 12.71 at 111.67 mph thanks to a couple of easy bolt-on parts, our driveline troubles left us in a bit of a predicament. First and foremost, we knew the clutch had to come out of the Camaro and we had to replace it with a more robust unit. Luckily, that was easy to solve with a quick call to SPEC, a company whose clutch components we have come to know and trust over the years. After talking to SPEC about our goals, they recommended we run a SPEC Stage 2+ (PN SC633H, $501), a clutch capable of holding 715 lb-ft of torque, which was more than enough for us. While capable of holding a lot of power, the SPEC 2+ is designed to remain docile on the street, so driveability wouldn't suffer and we wouldn't have to deal with chatter. To accompany our clutch, SPEC also sent us a new lightweight flywheel (PN SC57A, $399), which would help free up some ponies and allow our engine to rev a little faster.

1101gmhtp_01_o 2010_chevrolet_camaro_ss_clutch_and_ring_and_pinion_install Laying_down_rubber 2/37

The second issue, which was more problematic, was a smoked rearend. Of course, after all the abuse we put our test car through, we couldn't just call up our local dealership and have them warranty the stock posi unit, and, if we were going to tackle an upgrade by ourselves, we weren't about to install new posi clutches without also upgrading the stock gears. This left us with a couple of choices, which we finally solved by doing the following modifications. First, we called up General Motors and ordered a brand-new centersection, which shipped to us ready to install with new gears, bearings, and posi clutches. Then, we turned to Summit Racing to order a new Richmond 4.10 ring-and-pinion kit (PN 69-0492-1, $649.99), which we hoped would help get our Camaro off the starting line faster, improving both our 60-foot and quarter-mile times significantly.

1101gmhtp_03_o 2010_chevrolet_camaro_ss_clutch_and_ring_and_pinion_install Transmission_cradle_removal 3/37

After receiving the ring-and-pinion from Summit Racing, we immediately turned the package back around and sent it to 300 Below, a high-tech Cryogenic Processing and Tempering service located in Decatur, Illinois. While it is possible to run the Richmond gears (or any gear for that matter) without cryogenically treating them, we thought a little caution would go a long way; helping extended the life of our new gears and making them more resilient to breakage. If you are not familiar with cryo-treating, or have heard of it but don't understand it, 300 Below has a great way of explaining it: "By reducing the temperature of an object to around -300ºF, we seek to manipulate and rearrange its molecular structure without damaging the item. By rearranging the molecular structure of an object, and realigning the molecules so that they become more uniform and evenly spread out, we then change various properties associated with the object, such as its wear resistance. Our one-time, irreversible treatment lasts for the life of an object and improves the entire structure, not just the surface, giving you unmatched improvement over any other heat-treating or cold-treatment methods."

1101gmhtp_06_o 2010_chevrolet_camaro_ss_clutch_and_ring_and_pinion_install Stock_pressure_plate_removal 4/37

With all of our parts in hand, we turned the real work over to the pros at AntiVenom in Seffner, Florida, where Greg Lovell and Bruce Ponti got right to work, turning Greg's once sluggish 2010 into a quick accelerating screamer. Follow along to see how it is done.

MORE PHOTOS

VIEW FULL GALLERY

COMMENTS

subscribe to the magazine

get digital get print
TO TOP