Tarmac Twister Shootout - Special Feature

Lone Star Edition, Part 1

Randall D Allen Jun 10, 2010 0 Comment(s)
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Replacing the stock LS2 is a GMPP LSX short-deck block that's been bored and stroked to 455 ci, stuffed with a forged rotating assembly, and topped with a set of ARD-ported L92 heads that flow 370 cfm. If that wasn't enough, there's a 200-horse nitrous plate system with a dedicated fuel cell and an auxiliary pump to bump rwhp from 585 to 790. As the car is set up for street driving and the occasional road course, its suspension is very adept at corner carving and high-speed sweepers. Would the street tires have enough traction at the strip, or would this road warrior simply roast rubber? Assuming the former, could the nitrous even be enabled without breaking every IHRA rule in the book?

Priest and driver Gary Harmon found themselves in quite a quandary. Neither the Hoosier road-race tires they brought along nor the Nitto Invos the car usually runs could effectively harness the brute force of the 455. After numerous tire-pressure and suspension adjustments, the best naturally aspirated run came in at 12.17 at 121.85 mph, with a lazy 2.13 60-foot time and significant wheelhop. Given the lack of traction, Priest and Harmon elected not to unloose the nitrous and risk an "incident" partway down the track. But even in NA form, the C6 was probably capable of mid-11s given more time for chassis tuning and a sticky set of drag radials. And if grip had been more plentiful, it's a sure bet that a 10-second nitrous-assisted run would have lit up the board. Still, when you have a dialed-in street and road-race weapon at your disposal, it's better to head home in comfort and let your dedicated strip car do the heavy lifting (more on that next month).

Priest's faux Z06 may not have owned the field this day, but it was nevertheless a visual stunner with a muscle-bound genie under the hood, just waiting to pop out and smoke the competition.

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