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1967 Chevrolet Impala - Grandma's Pride

Grab The Groceries, Get In, Sit Down And Hold On

Mike Harrington Feb 12, 2007
1/5

By now it's obvious that the theme of this month's issue is the "ultimate streetcar." It would seem that if you ask 10 different people what their ultimate streetcar is, you're likely to get 12 different answers.

Thomas Young went to the grocery store one day, and saw an ad on a bulletin board advertising a '67 Impala for $1,000. He wanted that car, but was short on cash at the time. It turns out that Thomas has a generous grandmother who loaned him the loot to buy the car. However, things didn't always work out for Thomas, as far as building the Impala went. It took him nearly 10 years, and over the course of that decade, he just about sold it twice to rid himself of it. Obviously, patience and perseverance won the day, and he eventually finished his project car.

The visions Thomas had for this Impala was a near perfect restoration job, with some very slight modifications. The engine bay and its original 396 were cleaned and restored to its glorious factory-styled standards. Since the car only had 71,000 miles on it, it wasn't rebuilt, just cleaned. Needless to say, all the old hoses, wires, and clamps were replaced. The same holds true for the interior. Thomas had the interior replaced or revived back to its original factory style. The same care and attention were also applied to the underside. All suspension components were rebuilt, or replaced with original GM equipment. The only things that Thomas altered were the wheels, tires, steering wheel, torque converter, and obviously the paint. What one person considers a resto-rod, another guy, like Thomas, considers to be the ultimate street machine.

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