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LT4 Powered 1972 Camaro - Driftwood

Arnold Warner Has Had It All, But The '72 Camaro He Calls "Driftwood" Has Become His Beacon Of Enjoyment.

By Mike Ficacci, Photography by Dan Ryder, Mike Ficacci

Anold Warner's '72 Camaro provides escape on tap. Fire up the LT4 and just blast to wherever the wind blows. No Mapquest, Atlas, or destinations in mind-simply watch the miles roll by, indulging in the lost art of cruising.

The second-generation Camaro has exploded in popularity as its predecessor keeps rising in status (and price) to near-Corvette territory. Relatively cheap to get your hands on, tons of available aftermarket parts, and all the looks one could ask for, the early '70s are the new late '60s.

Since purchasing it last year, Arnold can't stop himself from getting in Driftwood and massacring car shows on the east coast. Woodgrain-style detail separates the House of Kolor Tangelo Pearl and Catch Me Orange paint scheme.

"With the theme of the car being woodgrain, the steering wheel, gauge cluster, and graphics splitting the two-tone, the name fit perfectly so we added it on the engine cover, and trunk," Arnold said. A gorgeous set of Billet Specialties wheels and a lowered stance (thanks to a full Air Ride suspension) cause "passing drivers do a double-take, and then they stare. Their eyes scan the length of the vehicle. They look. They smile. They nod. They love this vibrant car and so do I."

The fuel-injected LT4 Corvette powerplant is painted to match the exterior and is dressed in a wide assortment of billet/chrome accessories, including the A/C compressor, alternator, valve covers, and pulleys. The small-block pumps 350 horsepower out a set of Sanderson headers and sweet-sounding 3-inch Flowmaster exhaust system.

A limited slip 10-bolt with 3.10 gears was retained for the Camaro since Arnold has no plans of foot-braking this car in the near future. Why 3.10s, you ask? This car was meant to be a cruisin' machine, and in high gear this baby sings like a baritone. It bolts up to a stock driveshaft and Turbo 350 transmission with a B&M 3,000 rpm stall converter.

Underneath, he has full electronic adjustability, compliments of Air Ride Technologies suspension kit for the second generation Camaro and Firebird. At the flick of a button, he can change the car from highway height to "low and slow."

The exterior is matched on the inside with a full arrangement of wood accents, including a woodgrain Grant steering wheel, shifter plate, and dash backing plate filled with Auto Meter gauges. The console, bucket seats, and doors are covered in black leather and match the black loop & tuck carpet. Also, an aftermarket AM/FM/CD system was installed to make up for the inadequate 1972 system that may or may not have included an 8-track player.

Over 30 years, Arnold has gone through a wide variety of American-made cars. He's had high horse brawlers, limited edition hot rods, and even a Ford or two, but nothing compares to his present Camaro. We here at the magazine love the second generation F-body and are seeing more and more of them at every Super Chevy Show. Cars like Driftwood exemplify the capabilities of these once-neglected pony cars. They're abundant, sleek, and well-balanced machines waiting to be turned into works of art.

So which is it? Full bumper or split bumper?

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By Mike Ficacci
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